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You are About 1 Centimeter Taller in the Morning than in the Evening.

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You are about 1 centimeter taller in the morning than in the evening!

Don’t believe it?

You should just try measuring your height early in the morning and then again in the evening. You will be astonished to see that you were taller in the morning than you are in the evening!

This happens because of our body science that works differently, both in the morning and evening.

During the day when we are often engaged in performing our routine activities, the cartilage in our knees and other parts begin to compress gradually. On the contrary, when we go to sleep, our body is at total rest and without any major movements, so our cartilage again comes back to its original form. This is one of the reasons why we are taller in the morning. However, only by 1 cm.

The spinal cord also plays a significant role in supporting this phenomenon. Our spinal cord consists of 33 vertebrae, overlapping each other. It is only because of our vertebrae that we are able to sit, stand and walk. The vertebrae is further divided into following 5 sections:

  1. Cervical
  2. Dorsal
  3. Lumbar
  4. Sacral
  5. Coccygeal

The spinal cord has gentle materials in between the vertebrae. When the body is at total rest, while sleeping, the materials in the vertebrae stretch and thereby increase our height by 1 cm in the morning.

On the other hand, when we wake up, the body again starts working followed by continuous movements and due to our own body weight, the same materials get compressed; therefore, our height reduces by the evening.

In fact, gravity also flattens the materials between vertebrae and pushes out the water between our spinal discs while we are standing. This can make us lose a centimeter of our respective heights. And, as we are sleeping, the body is in a horizontal position, so it is not affected by the gravity.

Isn’t it amazing, how gravity and our body’s own mechanism can increase and decrease our height?!?

Reference: answersmanifatturafalomo