Most Japanese schools do not employ janitors or custodians.

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Most Japanese schools do not employ janitors or custodians. The Japanese education system believes that requiring students to clean the school themselves teaches respect, responsibility, and emphasizes equality.

Janitors or custodians are not appointed in a majority of the Japanese schools. The Japanese education system is of the belief that students must take the responsibility of cleaning the schools themselves. They must also learn to respect the teachers. Equality among all individuals is very much emphasized in the Japanese schools.

Yes, it might seem strange elsewhere in the world, but it is customary there. The students clean their own school and environment. The Japanese believe that teaching the kids to clean their school teaches them to treat one another with respect and it infuses a sense of responsibility.

The Japanese students take off their shoes before they enter their classrooms. They also swipe out the dust and dirt from their classroom themselves. What’s more? They even clean their own toilets!

This is why Japanese schools do not employ janitors or custodians. Keeping their surroundings clean is inevitably the students’ responsibility.

Another well known fact is that the Japanese have bamboo floor mats, also known as tatami. So in order to protect that from soil they take off their shoes before entering their homes. But what is more fascinating to know is that they practice this same procedure before entering any office building. This is to ensure that the building, which is not necessarily tatami, is free of dust particles.

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Also, in their culture it acts as a means of equalizer, when the teachers, students, and visitors take their shoes off before entering the school – they wear a slipper instead.

The Japanese culture places cleanliness in high regards! Not only in schools, but in other places as well, they strive for cleanliness.

Also note – any Japanese citizen who owns a dog, must carry a special bag always to pick up the dog droppings.

The janitors and the hygiene workers in Japan are known as “health engineers” and can be paid up to USD 5,000 to USD 8,000 a month! The cleaner must pass an oral and written test before he or she gets appointed.

Truly, the Japanese believe and act on the statement – “cleanliness is next to godliness”.

Just imagine if this were applied in all the countries throughout the world; we would be living in the cleanest environment no matter where we are! Hold that thought.

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