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15 Most Stunning Bridges You Will Ever See in the World

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15. Tsing Ma Bridge, Hong Kong, China

ehoba/wikimedia

ehoba/wikimedia

This Bridge is the ninth longest suspension bridge in the world. At the time of its completion, it was the second longest bridge in the world. However, there are no walkways on the bridge. What is unique about this bridge is that it carries the rail traffic as well, besides road. The decks of this bridge are 41m wide – you can guess how large a traffic it can hold. There is also a lower level on this bridge which holds two railways and two carriage ways which are sheltered. When the bridge has to be closed down due to typhoon attacks, those lower level pathways are typically used.

14. Tower Bridge, London, England

It is one of the most iconic symbols of London, built across the river Thames. Due to its proximity to the tower, it has derived the name Tower Bridge. This bridge opened up in June 30, 1894 and was inaugurated by The Prince of Wales. This Bridge has featured in many movies as well, but the most prominent one is the Hollywood blockbuster “Sherlock Holmes”.

13. Nanpu Bridge, Shanghai, China

Jakob Montrasio/flickr

Jakob Montrasio/flickr

One of the things that set this bridge apart from the rest is its spiral design – which looks very funky and modern. This unique design was constructed because the builders wanted to save space. So it is an ideal utilization of the little space the designers had got. The entire spiral spans across about 428 meters. Its sister bridge, Yangpu, is larger than it in size. It is a cable stayed bridge and is the 57th longest of its kind in the world. It was opened up for use in 1991.

12. Puente del Alamillio Bridge, Spain

pablofausto/wikimedia

pablofausto/wikimedia

This dazzling bridge was built in the year 1992, to connect the Canal de Alfonso XIII and La Cartuja – an island situated on the canal. The design is very unique and strikes the eye because it has a single cantilever pylon which supports the rest of the bridge – making it very graceful in appearance. The design apparently has a meaning – it was meant to express the soaring hopes of Seville during the 1992 Expo. But today it stands as a piece of wonder.

11. Ponte Vecchio, Florence, Italy

Eric Hossinger/flickr

Eric Hossinger/flickr

This medieval bridge situated over the river Arno, may not have the bells and the whistles of the modern day bridges. However what this bridge is known for is the souvenir sellers, jewelry shops and art stores on it. It is one of Europe’s oldest close spandrel, segmented arch bridge. This bridge has seen a lot of history, dating back to the time when the Romans roamed this place. Also, this bridge has survived the World War II – unlike many other bridges of Europe which have no existence now.

10. Gateshead Millennium Bridge, Gateshead, England

David P Howard/wikimedia

David P Howard/wikimedia

This bridge has been named the “blinking eye bridge” but is also known as the “winking eye bridge” sometimes due to the shape and design of its structure. It is currently the only tilting bridge of the world and its shape is also the first of its kind. But one of the funny things about this bridge is that whenever it is lowered or opened, it appears as if an eye is winking or blinking at the onlooker. Such innovative and unique design has won loads of awards ever since it opened up on September 2001. It was inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth herself.

9. Vasco da Gama Bridge, Lisbon, Portugal

This elongated bridge looks curvaceous along the Tagus River, which it spans across. It was built to ease the traffic congestion along the state and to provide an easier access to the 1998 World Fair, which lies along the banks of river Tagus. This bridge isn’t the tallest or the longest, but there is something pretty about its minimalistic design.

8. Jiaozhou Bay Bridge, Qingdao-Huangdao, China

Sean Russell/flickr

Sean Russell/flickr

This Bridge is just a tad shorter than 26 miles long and is the longest bridge over water in the world. It is supported by over 5000 pillars, and it transects the Jiaozuo Bay in the eastern part of China. It was thrown open to the public in 2011.

7. Brooklyn Bridge, New York City

pixabay

pixabay

Suiseiseki/wikimedia

Suiseiseki/wikimedia

John Atherton/wikimedia

John Atherton/wikimedia

It is one of America’s oldest suspension bridges which opened up in 1883. It gained more fame when it was declared not only the longest suspension bridge at 1595.5 feet height, but also the world’s first steel wire suspension bridge at the time. This bridge spans across the East River and it joins the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn. This bridge has already been declared as a National Historic Landmark in 1964.

6. Henderson Wave Bridge, Singapore

yeowatzup/flickr

yeowatzup/flickr

Schristia/flickr

Schristia/flickr

It is basically a pedestrian bridge connecting Mount Faber Park and Telok Blangah Hill Park. This unique bridge, built in the form of “waves” is situated over the bustling Henderson Road. It is in fact situated at a height of 118 feet above the road. The bridge is 900 foot in length and seems snake-like in appearance due to its curvy shape. These curves produce alcoves so that the passersby also get seated and sheltered.

5. Banpo Bridge, Seoul, South Korea

travel oriented/flickr

travel oriented/flickr

travel oriented/flickr

travel oriented/flickr

Sitting atop the Jamso Bridge, this bridge across the Han River creates a double decked effect on the area. But what really makes this bridge a hit among the locals and tourists is the 3,740 feet fountain emerging from either side. This fountain spans across the whole bridge – giving it an ethereal appeal. This fountain in fact broke the Guinness book records for its 10,000 LED nozzles which spray 190 tons of water every minute. This water comes from the river and gets recycled directly. This fountain has been listed as the world’s longest bridge fountain.

4. Chengyang Wind and Rain Bridge, Sanjiang County, China

Alexander Needham/wikimedia

Alexander Needham/wikimedia

Pratyeka/wikimedia

Pratyeka/wikimedia

The Wind and the Rain Bridge is situated along the Linxi River on Sanjiang County and has beautiful shades covering the entire bridge. In fact, the builders of this bridge didn’t use any nails or rivets to make it, but dovetailed thousand pieces of wood together – which is quite mesmerizing given the way it turned out. It was built in the year 1916 and was originally meant to depict a rainbow.

3. Juscelino Kubitschek Bridge, Brasilia, Brazil

Mugnatto/wikipedia

Mugnatto/wikipedia

Mariordo/wikipedia

Mariordo/wikipedia

This Bridge, also known as the JK Bridge, was opened in the year 2002. Its unique criss-cross steel arches drew a lot of fanfare in those times. The entire deck weight of the bridges is supported by these arches. It supports pedestrian, vehicular as well as bicycle traffic and the structure itself is 3,900 feet long.

2. Helix Bridge, Marina Bay, Singapore

Dudva/wikimedia

Dudva/wikimedia

Jeffery Wong/flickr

Jeffery Wong/flickr

Aneeth/flickr

Aneeth/flickr

This striking pedestrian’s bridge in the Marina Bay connects the central and southern parts of Marina Bay. It appears to be really gorgeous with its lighting. A syndicate of international design teams gave birth to the unique spirals that are part of this bridge. The canopies are built to provide shelter to the pedestrians from rain and sun. There are also platforms to view the Singapore skyline from here.

1. Millennium Bridge, London

 

Jan Kameníček/wikipedia

Jan Kameníček/wikipedia

Built across the River Thames, this iconic steel suspension footbridge connects Tate Modern Gallery and the City of London at St. Paul’s Cathedral. It was the first pedestrian bridge built in hundreds of years over Thames, when it was inaugurated in 2000.